Monday, 2 November 2009

Early Bank Woods


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Lets take a walk in Early Bank woods

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It's Autumn and the best time to see the woodlands

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Early Bank would have been part of a much bigger woodlands in years gone by but what is left are now protected.

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I'll be showing views from here all week so feel free to drop in when you can. Don't miss the sights this small woodlands as to offer.

12 comments:

Darla said...

Looking for bark are we?

Patty said...

Must have been a beautiful walk.

KAZ said...

Lovely Tom.
So glad I returned home to see the lovely Autumn colours last week.
I think winter arrived yesterday. Brrrrrrrrrrrr.

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

wonderful stuff Tom

Dewdrop said...

Thanks for your lovely compliments. This looks so much like scenes here. Beautiful!

imac said...

There's a lot of BARK there Tom-ass.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

Thank goodness it's protected! I's a pretty place...plus greedy developers don't need EVERYTHIBG!

PERBS said...

Love old growth forests! Look forward to the rest of your photo walk!

Lew said...

That is a steep and rocky walk! It's good that they protected this wonderful spot of woodland.

Tossing Pebbles in the Stream said...

Your woodlands always interest me. They all seem to be scruffier than what I am used to. So many of the trees are crooked and the forest floor degraded. Few trees seem to be a lumber grade. I guess it is because you have no truly wild forest and woodland get well traveled by people. The picture of the trees with the bared roots seem to be growing in a periodic water course. In a heavy rain the path becomes a creek.

We still have some virgin forests near here with magnificent tall white and red pine trees with deep moss on the forest floor. Sadly, they are progressively destroyed with logging. What results is a replanted plantation. A plantation of trees is not a forest. Some efforts to selectively cut and allow natural regeneration may result in a forest if we wait 150 to 300 years. Trees will be large enough to cut economically in 70 years. We will never see the truly large and ancient trees again. In the southern part of the US they can grow similar trees to the same size in 30 years due to the milder climate.

Did you read that Canada set aside 250 million acres of boreal forest to continue to act as a carbon vault or sink. Time to reforest your picturesque English moor lands! I always thing of them as degraded lands.

Tom said...

Philip... I have to admit we have similar thoughts on our Moors... most are now kept as moorland so the rich can shoot on them at certain times... others as areas for certain wildlife and birds to live.

Carletta said...

Love all these knarly roots!