Saturday, 31 October 2009

Two Bridges, One Right Of Way

Newton Hall Bridge
Dunkirk Lane

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Some of the canal bridges were built to carry 'Rights Of Ways' or 'Ancient Footpath'. Such rights of way have existed for many centuries and they were once considered to be the only safe way to travel, since they avoided bogs and other obstacles. Now these old pathways are getting forgotten and some lost for ever.

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As you head away from Ashton Under Lyne this is bridge No. 4 on the Peak Forest canal.

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Newton Hall Bridge carries an ancient right of way between Mottram In Longdendale and Dukinfield over the canal. This ancient right of way crosses this bridge, and the path then leads past the farm towards a bridge that crosses the river Tame.

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The pathway turns just before this bridge and follows the river for around 3/4 mile.. It then turns upwards again and leads you through Jet Amber fields towards bridge No.3 'Dukinfield Hall or Dukinfield Well Bridge' above, which in turn leads the walker onto Wellbridge Road, past Globe Square and onto Astley Street. This small walk is now one that I take now and then, it gives me exercise, fresh air and a sense of 'belonging' to the area. History is all around us and sometimes we can become apart of it by walking and keeping these pathways open.
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Have a great weekend
Happy Halloween

10 comments:

VioletSky said...

This looks like a lovely walk. I especially like the narrow footpath in the last picture.

Darla said...

I love the look of these bridges..Very interesting info here. I deleted the email with the sheild on it...I sent one of you guys a comment with my bottom lip poking out, asking for it again..
Tom--I would not be able to make it without flowers around me!!

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

Ah so Dunkirk Bridge as I've been calling it is actually Newton Hall Bridge.

RuneE said...

History is there if one looks for it, and you certainly does. I see from the comments that Gerald has also shown it (and I remember the name he used). But you do show it differently, and that completes it.

A very nice post.

√ Abraham Lincoln said...

Nice post, Tom. I remember such things here but canals and tow paths are a thing of the past and have all been incorporated into the landscape by Nature and farmers eager to add more land to their acreage.

Tom said...

Cheers everybody...... like Gerald I had always called that the Dunkirk bridge until I stumbled across it's name by chance...

I have had no time to visit this weekend with the house being filled with kids...
Tom

imac said...

Wonderful post Tom, but your photos are terrific.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Tom: That is a beauty.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

I really like the paths that run parallel to the canals. Too bad some are being forgotten.

Dave Dawson said...

In the 1950's I used to walk the original path down from Well Bridge, past Bradleyhurst Farm and Well Spring, across Johnson Brook valley which was then being filled in by the council tip. Then up to Dunkirk Farm and Bluebell Woods near to Newton Hall Bridge. In those days it was still a gravel road as it was when used as a main highway from Shepley up to Longdendale and Yorkshire