Sunday, 23 August 2009

Local Poet

Ammon Wrigley

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Ammon Wrigley (1861-1946) lived and died 'on the cold grey hills' of Saddleworth. He was born in Friarmere, Saddleworth in 1861 into a working class family which was familiar with hardship and poverty. By the age of nine he was working as a part timer in a local textile mill. He showed a keen interest in books and literature at an early age and wrote his first poem at the age of twelve. His developed an interest in the local folklore and history of the district, and it was these aspects of the Pennine culture which he came to record and celebrate in his writings. In prose and poetry he shows a vision of a world that he knew was disappearing and soon to be lost. He died in 1946 and, in keeping with his own wishes, his ashes were scattered at the Dinner Stone on Millstone Edge, Delph where a bronze memorial plaque was placed.

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I took both these and more pictures last year while walking around and driving the hill roads of Saddleworth.... I am sorting out some picture folders at the moment and when I saw the above building I was reminded of the poet Ammon Wrigley and his poem 'The Homestead', if you'd like to see more pictures of this old building and read the poem then visit my other blog Pictures & Words

20 comments:

Abraham Lincoln said...

I was at the other blog and read the poem and found it excellent. I also liked your photos there. I think they are excellent as well and the arch still standing is sort of amazing. Of all things standing, it stands tall without any effort. That is amazing to see.

Tom said...

I must admit Abe the arch caught my eye.. in fact theres two of them... built well. What a shame the rest was just left to tumble down.
Thanks for taking the time to visit the poem and read it.

imac said...

Like Abe I visited your other blog and read.
Tis a wonderful post.

RuneE said...

I think we have all read it - I side with Bar and Imac.

Patty said...

Wonder if he's any relation to the one that started the Wrigley's chewing gum?

Tom said...

Patty... you are indeed right.. and it was something I had forgotten about..
I have however come across this....

To the east of Oldham and bordering on the Pennines, Saddleworth dates from before the Norman Conquest and was mentionned in the Domesday Book, with Stone Age burial sites found nearby. A Roman road ran through a former fort established at Castleshaw in AD79. Abundant grazing land and soft water enabled a flourishing wool industry where local people were already skilled spinners and weavers centuries before the cotton industry came to nearby Oldham. Two-thirds of the area covered by Saddleworth is rural and is part of the Peak District National Park. It is home to a museum and many arts and crafts shops and hosts a famous brass band contest. Famous natives of the area are the Wrigley family, manufacturers of the well-known chewing gum.

I'm so glad you mentioned that

Your EG Tour Guide said...

I visited your other blog first too, Tom. Great post.

When I saw the name Wrigley I didn't think of gum (Guess I'm not a gum chewer.) I thought of Wrigley Field in Chicago, the baseball stadium. Hahaha

Linda - Gold Coast said...

You learn something new everyday. Thanks Tom. Wonderful post.

Virginia said...

What a lovely old place. You captured it so well. Don't you love digging around the photo archives??? I find some useable stuff sometimes!HA
V

alicesg said...

The statue is amazing and you show the history well. Geez, I used to like wrigley's chewing gum but chewing gum had been banned here. I actually forgotten how the taste is like...lol. The only chewing gum allowed here are those for dental purposes. The reason for banning chewing gum was to prevent people from stucking chewing gum onto lift buttons and the trains, airports, etc. That's why we are known as a clean and green city.

PERBS said...

How net to claim this special person for your own!

PERBS said...

I can't typd today -- sorry! Neat neat neat

SandyCarlson said...

I love the way you tell the story of your landscape, Tom. Thanks.

PERBS said...

type type type geeze


sigh

I read the poem on the other blog BUT you have it set up different there for comments and my old computer won't allow me to leave a comment there so I couldn't and didn't. Need a box to type in to work for this old computer.

I enjoyed the poem very much. "While Jenny, wore a scarlet shawl and lilac-coloured gown." I knew purple and red went together!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My Mom tried to tell me it didn't when I was a child. lol

Sorry I could not leave my comment on the other blog.
...

Arija said...

Tom, I love this picture of the decaying homestead and your little post on your local bard.
Tried the three links you left on your comment yesterday, and could not get a single one to function . Blogger was, I think, just being tricky again.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Tom: Thanks so much for stopping by. This is a neat statue of a special man. I will drop over to see the poem.

Kathiesbirds said...

That statue sure stands in a pretty setting. I have not heard of this poet but I will go read his poem. You captured my interest with this title!

Dewdrop said...

Pleased to make his acquaintance. Thanks for the visit, Tom! Sorry about your grey skies...

Deslilas said...

Very interesting as usual.
I must confess that for me Wrigley was associated to US chewing gum !

Tom said...

Thank you all for taking time out to see this post and then read the poem... I very nearly did not do this as the length of the poem had put me off before... I am now very glad I did.